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Kamungi Conservancy THE COMMUNITY AND CONSERVATION

The Conservancy has already started to facilitate the creation of alternative livelihoods (employment) that improve and diversify income streams (water supply and bee keeping) for the community.

This community has traditionally struggled to make a living through farming their land due to the semi-arid climate that does not favor small-scale agriculture. Annual rainfall can be as low as 250mm. Proximity of the community to Tsavo East National Park has led to Human Wildlife Conflict on a regular basis. Because this community is socially marginalized and struggling economically, illegal extraction of natural resources (wildlife poaching, hard wood extraction and charcoaling) from inside Tsavo East National Park by community members is commonplace. Historically, the WaKamba were expert bow and arrow hunters (often using lethal poison on their arrow tips). Due to the region’s poor economy, this tradition continues today, having a negative impact on Tsavo’s elephant population.

This region also serves as an entry point for illegal livestock incursions into the Protected Area and for “bushmeat” poachers who snare in an indiscriminate and unsustainable manner. People enter the park to fell hard wood trees for timber, for charcoal production and woodcarvings.

Unsustainable illegal activities that many individuals turn to for income and sustenance in marginalised communities:

Elephant poaching by poison arrow

Elephant poaching by cable snare

Bushmeat poaching

Hardwood extraction and charcoaling

Elephant poaching by poison arrow

Elephant poaching by cable snare

Bushmeat poaching

Hardwood extraction and charcoaling

Region as a Buffer Zone

The development of a community-led conservancy in this area has created a physical buffer, denying people free and easy illegal access to these key entry routes into Tsavo East National Park. The proposed conservation-based enterprises that could be initiated in this area include tourism ventures, which in addition to increasing revenue within the WaKamba community would support KWS through gate entrance to the National Park.

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